Enlarged Clitoris - Clitoromegaly

The male and female reproductive systems differentiate and develop under the influence of estrogen and testosterone. Even as an adult, the female reproductive system remains developmentally responsive to male sex hormones. An elevation of the androgen level in women may stimulate the growth of the clitoris (clitoral hypertrophy). If androgen levels are not abated quickly this may lead to virilization of the external genitalia, characterized by clinically abnormal enlargement of the clitoris (clitoromegaly). With clitoromegaly, the clitoris may begin to resemble a small penis, and may even visibly enlarge during sexual arousal (erection). In more serious cases its association to a male penis can be very striking and clear. Clitoromegaly can be a very embarrassing condition, usually prompting swift intervention when its onset is noticed.

Clitoromegaly is most commonly seen as a congenital disorder, although it may be caused by anabolic/androgenic steroid administration or other pathology in adulthood (acquired clitoromegaly). As a virilizing side effect, clitoromegaly tends to occur in a dose-dependant (androgenicity-dependent) manner. As such, higher doses and more androgenic substances (such as testosterone, trenbolone, and methandrostenolone) are more likely to trigger its onset. Primarily anabolic steroids such nandrolone, stanozolol, and oxandrolone are less androgenic and virilizing, and favored for the treatment of women for this reason. Clitoromegaly caused by steroid use is both avoidable and progressive. Mitigating excess androgenic action early when it is noticed is the most fundamental part of treatment. Reversal of significantly developed tissue, however, will require reconstructive surgery (clitoroplasty). Special care should be taken to preserve the dorsal and ventral neurovascular bundles and normal tissue sensation.

A photograph of distinct clitoromegaly. Here, the clitoris begins to resemble a penislike structure under androgen influence. If left unabated, this may progress to a more defined phallic abnormality. Source: Copcu et al. Reproductive Health 2004 1:4 doi:10.1186/1742-4755-1-4.

References

Wlliam Llewellyn (2011) - Anabolics

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